Archive for the 'Yorkshire Dales' Category

02
Sep
09

9/2/2009

Morning Tea: Carol at the Farmhouse B&B on our last morning.

Morning Walk: Carol at the Farmhouse B&B on our last morning.

Our last morning above Kendal at the farmhouse B&B. We moved that day down to Rutland Water in Leicestershire, and the Barnsdale Hall Resort, for a few days at the British Birding Fair (where I was on-duty at the Zeiss booth).

I like the colors and textures and angles of this shot.

Minolta A1 at about 32mm equivalent. F3.5 @ 1/60 @ ISO 100. Programed auto.

Punch and Sharpen landscape presets in Lightroom.

And that is, for now, the last of the shots from our 2005 trip to the Lakes and Dales.

01
Sep
09

9/1/2009

Carol in Dent

Carol in Dent

Dent is known for the “Terrible Knitters of Dent” who, back in the early 1800s turned out terrible quantities of hand knit socks, underwear, and other knit wool garments. The vision is of the whole population of Dent sitting out in chairs, young and old, up and down streets, dawn to dusk, with baskets of wool at their feet, and knit, knit, knit.

Today it is a sleepy tourist town, well off the beaten path (see yesterday’s pic), deep in the Dales. It caters to fishermen and trekkers. The streets are so narrow I have no idea how two cars meet. We made it through town to the parking on the far side without meeting anyone…and back out in the evening as well. That kind of town. It sets up on a ledge overlooking one of the most beautiful valleys in England, so picturesque it makes your shutter finger itch. Public paths extend out from the village in all directions. We hiked a half a day loop up river and down and back to the town. We did not see a single person the whole time we hiked. Peaceful isn’t even in it, as they might say in Dent.

This is the main street between the Church yard and the Post Office. The Church now doubles as a kind of local museum where you can find out all about the Terrible Knitters.

Minolta A1 at 28mm equivalent. F8.0 @ 1/640 @ ISO 100. Programmed auto.

Just Punch and Sharpen landscape in Lightroom. Blackpoint to the right slightly.

And to round out the experience, here is a bit of the Church Yard.

Church Yard and Bell Tower Museum

Church Yard and Bell Tower Museum

31
Aug
09

8/31/2009

Road to Dent

Road to Dent

On our last day in the Lakes and Dales, we took a drive in to Dent. I say “in to” since Dent is at the end of a Dales road, deep in, with no other way in or out. It is a typical Dales road. If you look at the where the road passes round the barn…or rather between the barn and the fence…you will notice it is two lane. At least it has a stripe down the middle. No way could two cars actually meet at that point. Each side is about 2/3s of a car width and the turn is, as you see, completely blind. And, since it is the only road, they drive full sized delivery trucks on this road, at speed, going into and out of Dent. Several times we were only saved because there was a gap in the stone wall right at the moment we needed it where a gate lead into a field. (The roads in the Hebrides are narrower…actually one lane, but they have frequent pull-outs for meeting cars, and everyone drives them like one-lane roads. In the Dales it seems everyone drives like they are on the motorway.)

Dent is beautiful, quaint, remote and worth the visit, but next time I will take the bus.

Minolta A1 at 28mm equivalent. F8 @ 1/640 @ ISO 100. Programed auto.

Punch and Sharpen landscape presets in Lightroom. Blackpoint to the right considerably, and heavy Recovery for the sky (and even then the lightest clouds are blown). Cropped slightly from the top.

From England 2005.

30
Aug
09

8/30/2009

Heather on the Dales

Heather on the Dales

Driving north over the top of the western Yorkshire Dales on a moody, dark, rainy day, we came to these fields of Heather…the first we had seen in England. Hours later, after a visit to the town where All Creatures Great and Small is set, we came back over the same road as the weather was breaking  and stopped for a series of pictures. I found the stone wall compelling in contrast to the heather.

Minolta A1 at 28mm equivalent. F8.0 @ 1/640 @ ISO 100. Programed auto, tilted exposure to emphasize the sky.

Even with the tilted exposure, which left the foreground too dark, the Minolta’s sensor could not capture the detail in the sky. The original of this looks dark with a washed out sky. Very disappointing.

In Lightroom, after applying the Punch and Sharpen landscape presets, I was able to use Fill Light to restore detail in the foregound and a Graduated Filter effect to bring up the detail in the sky. Blackpoint just to the right. Slight added contrast. A touch of brightness overall. Cropped from the bottom to eliminate a distracting white stone in the wall.

This is clearly an example of software over sensor photography. Still I have to say that the Minolta’s 5mp sensor did capture the detail needed. The internal software simply could not render it into an effective image. Lightroom to the rescue…that is not my style…generally post-processing is previsualized and part of my creative process at the point of capture. The Minolta however, did not lend itself to that process.

Still, it is the final image that counts. And I find this one true to the memory of the day.

From England 2005.

26
Aug
09

8/26/2009

Sweet Sleep

Sweet Sleep

We spent a late afternoon/early evening  in the little town at the edge of the Dales called Skipton.  This cat was decorating the bench outside the small Tourism Center where we went to gather information on the north west corner of the Dales, soaking up the last of the sun and the gathered warmth of the bench. With the flowers in the backgound, I could not resist.

Minolta A1 at 70mm equivalent. F5.0 @ 1/200 @ ISO 100. Programed auto.

Punch and Landscape sharpen preset in Lightroom. Blackpoint just slightly to the right.

From England 2005.

18
Aug
09

8/24/2009

Moor Top

Moor Top

Stone walls and sheep cots, with the Dales rising behind. This was the top of the Moors in this hike, and the snack truck was just behind me (hot tea and some sweet confection, thank you very much!)

Minolta A1 at 28mm equivalent. F5.6 @ 1/200th @ ISO 100. Programed auto.

Graduated filter effect from the top to bring out detail it the sky and hills. Blackpoint adjustment. Punch and Landscape sharpen presets.

18
Aug
09

8/22/2009

Fall on the Ingelton Water Falls Walk

Fall on the Ingelton Water Falls Walk

I can’t remember how many falls they claim for the Ingelton Water Falls Walk, but there are many. You go up one river, across the high moor, and down another river back to the junction where you started. This was one of the more prominent falls on the upward loop. We got there well before the car park opened, and the attendant eventually took pity and let us in early, so we were gloriously alone on the trial. A walk I will certainly remember and treasure forever. By afternoon, when we looked back at the moorland section of this trail from across the valley, it was like a city sidewalk with hikers. (So many people use the trail that two enterprising farmers have allowed snack booths along it were it passes through their land, one tended by foot, carrying everything quite a distance in, and one a truck that daily penetrates the deep cut lanes between stone walls to reach a likely vantage point on the top of the moor.)

Minolta A1 at 28mm equivalent. F2.8 @ 1/20th @ ISO 100. Programed auto.

Recovery for the highlights in the falls. Blackpoint adjustment. Punch and Landscape sharpen presets.




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