Archive for the 'snow drift' Category

12
Feb
11

2/12/2011: Welcome back to ME

That is Maine in the title…and I am back from a week of business meetings in Virginia. Though this pic was taken a week ago, it still looks like this in Maine. The snow is a bit more compacted, but there is still plenty on the ground. That is 5 foot snow fence. I still have a number of digiscoped shots from Florida to share, but, for today, I am back in ME.

Canon SX20IS at about 45mm equivalent field of view, f4 @ 1/1250th @ ISO 80. Snow Mode.

Processed for intensity and clarity in Lightroom.

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06
Jan
11

1/6/2011: Baston Brook Buried

Emmon’s Preserve fills a bow in Baston Brook (river?) where the stream descends over rock ledges on its final run to the sea. The little falls, swirling rapids, and quiet pools there have given me a lot of entertainment over the years.

When I hiked in the other day after our December blizzard, I don’t know exactly what I expected, but it was certainly not to find the stream all but buried in snow.

For contrast, here is a very similar view from last March.

I was standing slightly further to the right in the top shot, simply because I did not know, after the blizzard, where land stopped and water began under the drifts, and I was not about to find out the hard way.

Today’s shot, Canon SX20IS at 28mm equivalent, f4 @ 1/250th @ ISO 80. Snow Mode. March shot much the same but 1/125th and Landscape Mode.

Both processed in Lightroom for intensity and clarity.

03
Jan
11

1/3/2010: sculpted by the wind, revealed by the light

While we are looking at drifts….

Snow is an interesting medium for the wind to sculpt. Unlike sand, it has, when the temperatures are just right, some coherence of its own. It can and does assume shapes sand could never manage. This limits what the wind can do with it, but it also gives rise to classic curves, edges, and ledges…to undercuts and overhangs…to the closest thing to what water does with soft stone that wind can manage. The difference is, of course, that stone endures. These shapes are long melted to an undistinguished mound.

And then you have the shadows and light.

Canon SX20IS, 180mm equivalent, 1) f5 @ 1/1250th @ ISO 80. 2) f5@ 1/800th @ ISO 80. Snow Mode.

Processed for intensity and clarity in Lighroom.

02
Jan
11

1/2/2011: Tracks in the drift

Happy first Sunday of 2011!

Some brave soul drove down this road at Laudholm farm after the December blizzard, which was nice for me, since I could not have made it out this far without snowshoes or skis through unbroken drifts. This is the road after the tracks stopped, and that snow is waste deep.

I love, again, what wind and light can do with snow.

Canon SX20IS at 28mm equivalent. Both f4 @ 1/1000 @ ISO 80 and Snow Mode.

Processed for intensity and clarity in Lightroom.

At it is true in spiritual terms too. You can get further out if you flow the tracks of same brave soul (especially one in a high powered, high clearance vehicle with 4 wheel drive!) but what makes it worth the effort at all is the unbroken snow (spiritual ground) at the end of the beaten track. You may only be able to stand and look, but what flows back to you from that place you can’t go is the stuff that fills your soul and sends you back home along the beaten track satisfied. Or so it did me.

Smile

30
Dec
10

12/30/2010: Drift!

Bright sun on snow! Always an exposure challenge, but who could resist the wind sculpted shapes of this drift (any drift you don’t have to drive through for that matter). We are along the edge of Back Creek where it flows into the Mousam River in Kennebunk ME…where the fields meet the fall to the marsh…and the high winds of the blizzard of the day before (continued into this day) dropped the snow into graceful folds and impossible shelves, half burying the Beach Rose in the process.

And, actually, with today’s best P&S cameras, Snow Mode does an amazing job of simplifying the exposure problem. The shots I took this day in unaltered Snow Mode are among the best sun-on-snow shots I have ever recorded. The shots where I second guessed the exposure system…not so much!

And here we are closer in: notice the plume of blowing snow off the top. The wind is not done with this drift.

Take a look at this one as large as you monitor will allow.

Canon SX20IS in Snow Mode. 1) 70mm, f4 @ 1/1000th @ ISO 80. 2) 250mm, f5 @ 1/1000th @ ISO 80.

Processed in Lightroom for intensity and clarity. These shots could only stand a very slight amount of black-point adjustment. Both were cropped for composition and interest.