Archive for the 'waterfall' Category

10
Jan
11

1/10/2011: running away icy

I think this will be my last pic taken in 2010. Tomorrow we will move into the new year! This is Emmon’s Preserve again, in Kennebunkport Maine, with the little Baston Brook (river?) running down over ledges away from us. It was a difficult shot to frame as there was no clear line of site.

This is the wider view, which I also quite like, despite its busy foreground.

If you compare the two you will see that I had to clone out the little branch tip in the first shot.

Canon SX20IS at 85mm equivalent, f4 @ 1/125 @ ISO 80, Snow Mode, and at 28mm equivalent, f4 @ 1/250 @ ISO 80, Snow Mode.

Processed in Lightroom for intensity and clarity (see page link above).

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09
Jan
11

1/9/2011: If dancing water froze

Happy Sunday!

I suppose there is no real surprise here…other than the fact that it is possible. This is what even the most rapidly flowing, swirling, jumping water coming down a little series of falls in Maine looks like when it freezes. It captures the motion in solid form. It turns the music of the rapids into intricate folds and fingers of ice. How? I will admit, I can not quite imagine it.

But then I don’t really need an explanation. It is enough to find it there on my walk…to see it for what it is…and to bring it home to share with you…to bear witness.

It is an instance of truth that must be seen to be believed, and that, once seen, is sufficient to itself.

It is Sunday, and you might be ahead of me with where this image is leading me. Because, of course, what I see and appreciate in this image shares an identity with what I see and most appreciate in the spirit. The essence of faith is that it is possible even when we can’t imagine how…but it is also truth apprehended, seen, touched, felt, experienced…that is sufficient to itself, beyond the need for explanations. Like dancing water frozen and yet in still in motion, truth is something we must experience, and that we can only bear witness to. With no spiritual camera to bring back the evidence to share, I have no choice but to become the dancing water, to let the frozen motion form within me, to let truth perceived shape my life into a living witness.

In that sense, what matters here is the taking of the image, and its sharing, not so much the image itself.

Canon SX20IS at 560mm equivalent, f5.7 @ 1/200th @ ISO 200. Snow Mode.

Processed for clarity and intensity in Lightroom.

22
Jul
10

7/23/2010

Fountain

A fountain detail from the MacArthur Plaza in Santa Ana. Late evening light in Southern California.

Canon SD4000IS Digital Elph at about 46mm equivalent field of view @ f3.5 @ 1/800th @ ISO 125. Programmed auto.

Some Recovery in Lightroom. A touch of Fill Light, Blackpoint just right, added Clarity and just a bit of Vibrance. Sharpen narrow edges preset.

From Zeiss Trip CA 2010.

22
Mar
10

3/23/2010

Balson River, Emmons Preserve, Kennebunkport ME

I have attempted to photograph this stream in every season over the past 12 years. It is on a little pocket preserve tucked in between the homes on two back roads…gifted to the Kennebunkport Conservation Trust some years ago, and developed just enough for easy access…once you know it is there. The stream, or river, depending, goes from a trickle at mid summer to a full raging torrent during the storms of spring and fall. Or it can be an icy cascade in winter, with every willow wand along the bank hung with ice bells. I have seen it in every light.

And it is always a bear to photograph. The range of light, from deep shadow to bright sun on the foaming water of the falls, from the incredible dark green of the moss in the shade, to the pure silver light reflected off leaves, is just way beyond any sensor’s ability. I even wrote a whole Point and Shoot Landscape piece on exposing for post-processing based on my trials here: the only way to come close to capturing the range is to expose so that both shadow and highlight detail can be restored in post-processing. Of course, that means that the images, out of camera, can look pretty strange.

So…with a new camera and all, I had to try again…or at least make a beginning in the process of learning how to use this camera to capture an image in Emmon’s Preserve…since no two cameras have the same range of possibility when it comes to that (or anything else).

All the shots taken that day were experiments. I found that with previous cameras you could not use exposure compensation to save the highlights. That left the shadows too dark, and post-processing added to much noise. Still, I know that photographically, exposure compensation is the right solution here, so I was trying what the Canon could do. This exposure was at –1 EV, and, with processing in Lightrroom, it is one of the most successful shots of the Balson that I have ever taken. The highlights and sunny bank areas are just within range (having applied some Recovery in Lightroom), and the shadows opened up well with just enough Fill Light not to produce much noise. Granted, it will get worse when the leaves come out and the shadows deepen…but for now, I am really liking this rendering. The dynamic range is very natural…both shadows and highlights are much as the eye would see them in real time: and that, ultimately, is my goal.

(By the way, I am not an advocate of the silky water school of stream photography. I have another P&S Landscape piece on that. I prefer to let the shutter freeze some of the water motion…since, in real time, I see something closer to the detail of frozen water, than I do to the silky blur. I find the patterns of swirl and bubble infinitely fascinating.)

Canon SX20IS at just under 60mm equivalent. F4 @ 1/200 @ ISO 80. Landscape preset. (Landscape preset, by the way, does better, somehow, for color balance than regular Program does on auto. It handled the open shade here just fine.)

In Lightroom, as mentioned, Recovery for highlights, Fill Light for shadows (but not much). Blackpoint just slightly right. Added Clarity and just a tiny amount of Vibrance. Sharpen landscape preset.

From Around Home 2010.

22
Jan
10

1/23/2010

Coins in the Waterfall

This is an impulse I have never understood. Pool, fountain, or in this case the head of the artificial waterfall at the Palizzo in Vegas. The moving water here adds what is perhaps an extra dimension.

Sony DSC H50 at about 55mm equivalent. F2.8 @ 1/60 @ ISO 100. Programmed auto.

Blackpoint right in Lightroom. Added Clarity and Vibrance. Sharpen landscape preset.

From Las Vegas 2010.

18
Aug
09

8/23/2009

Grand Falls

Grand Falls

The highest of the Falls above Ingleton and a show piece of the Yorkshire Dales. You can see the limits of the camera clearly here. I had to apply a graduated filter effect from the top to darken the sky, and even then could find no real detail. Of course, it was one of those white English skys, on the edged of rain, with no real features.

Still, the falls carries the image.

Minolta A1 at 28mm equivalent. F5.0 @1/200th @ ISO 100. Programed auto.

As above, graduated filter effect from the top. Blackpoint adjustment. Fill Light. Punch and Landscape sharpen presets.

18
Aug
09

8/22/2009

Fall on the Ingelton Water Falls Walk

Fall on the Ingelton Water Falls Walk

I can’t remember how many falls they claim for the Ingelton Water Falls Walk, but there are many. You go up one river, across the high moor, and down another river back to the junction where you started. This was one of the more prominent falls on the upward loop. We got there well before the car park opened, and the attendant eventually took pity and let us in early, so we were gloriously alone on the trial. A walk I will certainly remember and treasure forever. By afternoon, when we looked back at the moorland section of this trail from across the valley, it was like a city sidewalk with hikers. (So many people use the trail that two enterprising farmers have allowed snack booths along it were it passes through their land, one tended by foot, carrying everything quite a distance in, and one a truck that daily penetrates the deep cut lanes between stone walls to reach a likely vantage point on the top of the moor.)

Minolta A1 at 28mm equivalent. F2.8 @ 1/20th @ ISO 100. Programed auto.

Recovery for the highlights in the falls. Blackpoint adjustment. Punch and Landscape sharpen presets.